Showing all posts written by Raina Patel

Raina Patel
Raina Patel
Raina Patel is in the New York office and focuses primarily on patent prosecution and patent analysis. While most of her work is in the medical device space, she also has experience in the food/beverage, fashion, and consumer products industries. While in law school, Raina helped develop patent strategies for a wide variety of inventions while working at Boston University’s Office of Technology Development. She also worked with a biotech startup organizing and advancing their patent portfolio.

New York Bar Admission Pending

AI and Cancer Diagnostics

Rather than simply reading radiological scans, Ibex Medical Analytics is employing its artificial intelligence (AI)-powered cancer detection solutions to assist pathologists in the lab. Ibex’s Galen Platform is a clinical-grade, multi-tissue platform that helps pathologists detect a variety of cancers and grade their malignancies.  Ibex states that the platform can also “detect more than a hundred other clinically relevant diagnostic features in multiple tissue types.” Ibex leverages data extracted from millions of pathology slides along with AI and machine learning to perform its platform’s diagnostic functions.

Ibex reports that its breast cancer diagnostic tool, Galen Breast, delivered clinical grade accuracy in diagnosing multiple breast cancer types in a recent multi-site clinical study conducted at Institut Curie in France and Maccabi Healthcare Services in Israel. The study compared the performance of pathologists using Ibex AI against pathologists using traditional microscopes to diagnose multiple types of breast cancer. The study results showed the Galen Breast tool could detect various forms of breast cancer at a level of accuracy on par with trained pathologists. According to an Ibex press release, Galen Breast technology has shown the ability to detect both invasive and in-situ cancers in breast biopsies, distinguish between multiple sub-types of cancer (e.g., lobular versus ductal carcinoma), grade cancer severity in situ, and identify rare tumors. The Galen Platform additionally offers AI solutions for the detection of prostate and gastric cancers, which Ibex states also deliver clinical grade accuracy.

More recently, the company announced the launch of its latest Galen Platform version, Galen 3.0.  Ibex reports that Galen 3.0 provides expanded detection capabilities and a broader set of features to support pathologists in diagnosing breast, prostate, and gastric cancers.

 

Osteoconductive Filament Developed for 3D Printed Implants

Osteoconductive Filament Developed for 3D Printed Implants

“No other application field showcases more the classic advantages of 3D printing, such as individualization or design freedom, than medical technology,” says Marc Knebel, Head of Medical Systems at Evonik.

Evonik is a specialty chemical company developing biomaterials that serve as metal-free alternatives to traditional bone implants. Evonik’s VESTAKEEP product line includes an osteoconductive polyether ether ketone (PEEK) – a biostable polymer having similar mechanical properties to the human bone, which promotes osteointegration. According to Evonik, combining the PEEK material with the functional additive biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP) accelerates fusion at the bone-implant boundary, allowing bone cells to adhere to the implant more quickly. Unlike traditional titanium implants, Evonik claims that its PEEK-based polymer does not produce any unwanted artifacts in medical imaging processes such as X-ray or MRI. Further, Evonik indicates that the BCP additive provides a natural shadow allowing for accurate implant placement and observation of the fusion process.

Evonik is now set to add a new 3D-printable version of the osteoconductive PEEK material to their Fusion product line. The VESTAKEEP iC4800 3DF PEEK filament can be processed using the common extrusion-based 3D printing technology known as fused filament fabrication (FFF), in which a 3D printer releases a raw material out of a nozzle or orifice to build an object layer by layer. The PEEK filament, which has a diameter of 1.75 mm, is wound onto 250- or 500-gram spools suited for standard FFF 3D printers. Evonik reports that customer feedback and tests carried out on various 3D printers confirm the processability of the new filament.

Further, Evonik indicates that this osteoconductive filament is specially designed such that the functional additives are available directly on the surface of the 3D printed implant without film formation. This eliminates the need for additional post-processing steps, which Evonik touts as a novelty for osteo-integrative PEEK biomaterials.

The original VESTAKEEP Fusion product is available in  granulate form and capable of being milled, compression molded, extruded and injection molded. The addition of this 3D printable filament expands the range of applications for osteoconductive implants even further, and allows for easier and improved customization of implants for patients.

Evonik plans to present the new product for the first time at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) trade show in Chicago later this month (March 2022).